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People with major cognitive impairment increased from 20.2 million in 1990 to 43.8 million in 2016. By 2050, this number is expected to reach 100 million (Lancet Neurology, 2019).

The objective of the Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology laboratory is to improve the quality of life of people living with these diseases. To do so, we pursue two lines of research: i) to increase knowledge of the cerebral bases of cognition, emotion and behavior, and (ii) improve the evaluation and rehabilitation of these processes.

The laboratory is currently attached to the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences at the University of Geneva, and enjoys close ties with the Neuropsychology Unit of the Neurology Department at University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG). Moreover, the laboratory is affiliated with two interfaculty centers, the Swiss Center for Affective Sciences and the Swiss Center for the Interdisciplinary study of Gerontology and Vulnerability.

The Unit’s research programme gives students an opportunity to hone their clinical neuropsychology skills and gain experience with clinical populations (primarily adults), while at the same time exploring research questions relating mainly to neuropsychological syndromes and their neuroanatomical substrates–questions that have both theoretical and applied implications.

 

​”As an artist who explores the complexity and beauty of the imperfect brain, I am fascinated by the work of Julie Péron and the Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology Laboratory. Their exploration of the emotional processes of neurological disease produces critical information involving both theoretical and clinical implications that adds to understanding the mysteries of the emotional brain. As someone who lives with disease involving the brain, I am inspired by the work and dedication of the CEN Laboratory to improve the lives of those living with neurological disease.”

Elizabeth Jameson

 

Header image: “Valentine – Coronal view of the Artist’s brain stem, cerebellum, and lateral ventricles” by E. Jameson